Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is damage to the retina caused by complications of diabetes and is the leading cause of blindness in American adults.

It is an ocular manifestation of diabetes, a systemic disease, which affects up to 80 percent of all patients who have had diabetes for 10 years or more. The longer a person has diabetes, the higher his or her chances of developing diabetic retinopathy.

Despite these intimidating statistics, research indicates that at least 90% of new cases could be reduced by preventative monitoring during regular eye examinations and proper treatment.

There are multiple forms of diabetic retinopathy, and only your doctor can determine your particular form. With one form, blood vessels may swell and leak fluid. In another, abnormal new blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina.

In the early stages of diabetic retinopathy, many do not notice a change to their vision because there are little to no symptoms. If an eye doctor does not catch the disease early, one could sustain mild blurriness at near or in the distance, as well as floaters. In severe cases a sudden loss of vision may occur.

Unfortunately, Diabetic Retinopathy can result in permanent damage that cannot be reversed. However, if caught in time, prescribed treatments may slow development and prevent vision loss.

If you have diabetes and are concerned about diabetic retinopathy, schedule an appointment with Dr. Becker, Dr. Moran, or Dr. Nielubowicz for a comprehensive eye exam and be sure to include it on your patient history form.

Covid-19 Update

Due to the executive order from the governor, our office will be closed to routine patients until April 13.  If you have any questions or concerns, please don't hesitate to call us at 248-628-3441 and we will do our best to assist you.  Our doctors are available to speak to you over the phone, and we also have access to tele-health visits.  Thank you.

We are here for you. We are still able to provide care on an urgent or emergency basis.

What constitutes urgent or emergency eye care?

  • Your eye is red, itchy or watering.
  • Your eye is crusty
  • Your eye is bloodshot
  • You have cloudy vision or cobwebs in your vision
  • You have new floaters or flashes of light
  • You have lost or broken your only pair of glasses
  • You have new blurred vision (with your glasses on)
  • You have new double vision.
  • You have a swollen eye.
  • You have something stuck in your eye.
  • You have new distortion in your vision.
  • You have eye pain.

Please call our office at 248-628-3441 or email info@waltonandbecker.com to talk with a technician or Doctor.