Retinal Tears and Detachments

Retinal tears and detachments are conditions where the inner lining of the eye called the retina is damaged. The retina is a layer of tissue that’s light-sensitive and sends visual information through the optic nerve to the brain. If damaged, this layer of tissue can eventually detach from the inside of the eye, causing permanent vision loss.

A retinal tear describes a small break in this lining. Retinal tears can have many causes and can happen at any age. Retinal tears can be treated with laser surgery or an advanced “freezing” process. Both of these treatment options attempt to keep the retina in place and keep it from fully detaching.

Retinal detachment describes a much larger separation of the retina tissues and although it is not exclusive to older people, it’s more common in those over age 40. If detected with an eye exam early enough, retinal detachment can be treated with the procedures used for some tears, or with a more intricate surgery that uses gas to push the retina together with the wall of the eye to allow for reattachment.

Aging, eye trauma, eye surgery, or being drastically nearsighted may cause retinal tears or detachments. Symptoms of these retinal conditions may include seeing flashes or floaters, sudden blurry vision, and seeing an area of dark vision.

An eye exam is very important when these symptoms occur as permanent eyesight loss may occur if the retina problem is not treated in a timely manner.

Retinal Tears and Detachments

Covid-19 Update

Due to the executive order from the governor, our office will be closed to routine patients until April 13.  If you have any questions or concerns, please don't hesitate to call us at 248-628-3441 and we will do our best to assist you.  Our doctors are available to speak to you over the phone, and we also have access to tele-health visits.  Thank you.

We are here for you. We are still able to provide care on an urgent or emergency basis.

What constitutes urgent or emergency eye care?

  • Your eye is red, itchy or watering.
  • Your eye is crusty
  • Your eye is bloodshot
  • You have cloudy vision or cobwebs in your vision
  • You have new floaters or flashes of light
  • You have lost or broken your only pair of glasses
  • You have new blurred vision (with your glasses on)
  • You have new double vision.
  • You have a swollen eye.
  • You have something stuck in your eye.
  • You have new distortion in your vision.
  • You have eye pain.

Please call our office at 248-628-3441 or email info@waltonandbecker.com to talk with a technician or Doctor.